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December 7, 2021 

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PRICE CONTROLS: Government intervention in markets in which legal restrictions are placed on the prices charged. The two basic types of price controls are price ceilings and price floors. Price ceilings are maximum prices set below the equilibrium price. Price floors are minimum prices set above the equilibrium price. Price controls imposed on an otherwise efficient and competitive market create imbalances (shortages or surpluses) which cause inefficiency. However, imposing price controls on a market that fails to achieve efficiency (due to market control, externalities, or imperfect information) can actual improve efficiency. Price controls have also be used economy-wide in an attempt to reduce inflation.

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MARGINAL FACTOR COST: The change in total factor cost resulting from a change in the quantity of factor input, found by dividing the change in total factor cost by the change in quantity of factor input. Marginal factor cost, abbreviated MFC, indicates how a firm's total factor cost is affected by hiring one more or one fewer worker. Two related concepts are total factor cost and average factor cost.

     See also | marginal cost | marginal factor cost curve | input | factors of production | total factor cost | factor markets | average factor cost | marginal revenue product | perfect competition | factor markets | perfectly elastic | factor price | imperfect competition | monopsony | factor supply curve |


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2021. [Accessed: December 7, 2021].


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AVERAGE REVENUE PRODUCT CURVE

A curve that graphically illustrates the relation between average revenue product and the quantity of the variable input, holding all other inputs fixed. This curve indicates the per unit revenue at each level of the variable input. The average revenue product curve is one of two related curves often used in the analysis of factor demand. The other, and more important, is marginal revenue product curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time surfing the Internet looking to buy either a T-shirt commemorating the second moon landing or a coffee cup commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
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On a typical day, the United States Mint produces over $1 million worth of dimes.
"Use, do not abuse; neither abstinence nor excess ever renders man happy."

-- Voltaire, philosopher

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