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May 16, 2021 

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TRANSPORTABLITY: One of four characteristics that enables an asset to better function as money. The other three are durability, divisibility, and non-counterfeitability. This characteristic means that the item used as money can be easily moved from one location to another, which is extremely useful because markets tend to be scattered all over the place. It really helps if buyers can transport their money to the points of purchase. An item could not be effectively used as a medium of exchange if it were not easily transportable.

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FACTOR MARKETS: Markets used to exchange the services of a factor of production: labor, capital, land , and entrepreneurship. Factor markets, also termed resource markets, exchange the services of factors, NOT the factors themselves. For example, the labor services of workers are exchanged through factor markets NOT the actual workers. Buying and selling the actual workers is not only slavery (which is illegal) it's also the type of exchange that would take place through product markets, not factor markets. More realistically, capital and land are two resources than can be and are legally exchanged through product markets. The services of these resources, however, are exchanged through factor markets. The value of the services exchanged through factor markets each year is measured as national income.

     See also | factor payments | factors of production | labor | capital | land | entrepreneurship | market | resource markets | services | product markets | financial markets | national income | personal income | disposable income | circular flow | business sector | household sector | factor demand | factor supply | monopsony |


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FACTOR MARKETS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2021. [Accessed: May 16, 2021].


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NET-EXPORT EFFECT

A change in aggregate expenditures on real production, especially net exports from the foreign sector, that results because a change in the price level alters the relative prices of exports and imports. The net-export effect, also termed the international-substitution effect, is one of three effects underlying the negative slope of the aggregate demand curve associated with a movement along the aggregate demand curve and a change in aggregate expenditures. The other two are real-balance effect and interest-rate effect. The net-export effect is somewhat analogous to the substitution effect underlying the negative slope of the market demand curve.

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