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January 18, 2022 

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PART-TIME WORKERS: People who are willing and able to work full-time (over 35 hours per week), but are forced to work less because employers don't need their productive efforts. While part-time workers officially have jobs, and are officially included in the "employed" category when the official unemployment rate is calculated, their labor resources are really only partially unemployed. A person working 20 hours a week, who is willing and able to work 40 hours a week, really should be considered as "half employed."

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FACTOR MARKETS: Markets used to exchange the services of a factor of production: labor, capital, land , and entrepreneurship. Factor markets, also termed resource markets, exchange the services of factors, NOT the factors themselves. For example, the labor services of workers are exchanged through factor markets NOT the actual workers. Buying and selling the actual workers is not only slavery (which is illegal) it's also the type of exchange that would take place through product markets, not factor markets. More realistically, capital and land are two resources than can be and are legally exchanged through product markets. The services of these resources, however, are exchanged through factor markets. The value of the services exchanged through factor markets each year is measured as national income.

     See also | factor payments | factors of production | labor | capital | land | entrepreneurship | market | resource markets | services | product markets | financial markets | national income | personal income | disposable income | circular flow | business sector | household sector | factor demand | factor supply | monopsony |


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST

The change in total factor cost resulting from a change in the quantity of factor input employed by a firm. Marginal factor cost, abbreviated MFC, indicates how total factor cost changes with the employment of one more input. It is found by dividing the change in total factor cost by the change in the quantity of input used. Marginal factor cost is compared with marginal revenue product to identify the profit-maximizing quantity of input to hire.

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