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CAPITAL ACCOUNT: One of two parts of a nation's balance of payments. The capital is a record of all purchases of physical and financial assets between a nation and the rest of the world in a given period, usually one year. On one side of the balance of payments ledger account are all of the foreign assets purchase by our domestic economy. On the other side of the ledger are all of our domestic assets purchased by foreign countries. The capital account is said to have a surplus if a nation's investments abroad are greater than foreign investments at home. In other words, if the good old U. S. of A. is buying up more assets in Mexico, Brazil, and Hungry, than Japanese, Germany, and Canada investors are buying up of good old U. S. assets, then we have a surplus. A deficit is the reverse.

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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE: A curve that graphically represents the relation between factor quantity and the marginal factor cost incurred by a firm for buying or hiring a factor of production. Marginal factor cost curve indicates how a firm's total factor cost is affected by hiring one more or one fewer worker. This curve is constructed to capture the relation between marginal factor cost and the factor quantity, holding other variables constant.

     See also | marginal factor cost | curve | marginal cost | input | factors of production | factor markets | average factor cost curve | marginal revenue product curve | perfect competition | factor markets | perfectly elastic | factor price | imperfect competition | monopsony | factor supply curve |


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: May 22, 2024].


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SLOPE, SAVING LINE

The positive slope of the saving line is also termed the marginal propensity to save (MPS). This slope is greater than zero but less than one, reflecting induced saving and the Keynesian psychological law of consumer behavior that saving increases by less than the increase in income. The slope of the saving line provides the foundation for the slope of the leakages line used in the injections-leakages model. It thus also affects the magnitude of the multiplier process.

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