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AGGREGATE DEMAND CURVE: A graphical representation of the relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate demand determinants constant. The aggregate demand, or AD, curve is one side of the graphical presentation of the aggregate market. The other side is occupied by the aggregate supply curve (which is actually two curves, the long-run aggregate supply curve and the short-run aggregate supply curve). The negative slope of the aggregate demand curve captures the inverse relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level. This negative slope is attributable to the interest-rate effect, real-balance effect, and net-export effect.

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MARGINAL PROPENSITY TO SAVE: The proportion of each additional dollar of household income that is used for saving. Or alternatively, this is the change in saving due to a change in disposable income. Abbreviated MPS, the marginal propensity to save is the slope of the saving or propensity-to-save line. It also takes center stage for the multiplier effect. In particular, the inverse of the MPS is the simple expenditure multiplier. The sum of the marginal propensity to save and the related concept, the marginal propensity to consume, is equal to one.

     See also | saving | disposable income | saving line | Keynesian economics | multiplier | marginal propensity to consume | marginal propensity to import | marginal propensity to invest |


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INELASTIC

The general relation between two variables in which relatively large changes in one variable (A) cause relatively small changes in another variable (B). In other words, large changes in variable A cause relatively small changes in variable B or the percentage change in variable B is smaller than the percentage change in variable A. This characterization of elasticity is most important for the price elasticity of demand and the price elasticity of supply. Inelastic is one of two general elasticity relations between two variables. The other is elastic.

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General Electric is the only stock from the original 1896 Dow Jones Industrial Average remaining in the current index.
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