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MARGINAL PROPENSITY TO INVEST: The proportion of each additional dollar of national income that is used for investment expenditures. Or alternatively, this is the change in investment expenditures due to a change in national income. Abbreviated MPI, the marginal propensity to invest is the slope of the investment line used in the analysis of Keynesian economics. As such, it also plays a role in the slope of the aggregate expenditure line and the multiplier effect.

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KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS: A school of thought developed by John Maynard Keynes built on the proposition that aggregate demand is the primary source of business cycle instability, especially recessions. The basic structure of Keynesian economics was initially presented in Keynes' book The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, published in 1936. For the next forty years, the Keynesian school dominated the economics discipline and reached a pinnacle as a guide for federal government policy in the 1960s. It fell out of favor in the 1970s and 1980s, as monetarism, neoclassical economics, supply-side economics, and rational expectations became more widely accepted, but it still has a strong following in the academic and policy-making arenas.

     See also | Keynesian theory | macroeconomics | Great Depression | aggregate demand | business cycle | recession | depression | classical economics | monetarism | cross elasticity of demand | supply-side economics | full employment | Keynesian cross | unemployment rate | gross domestic product | full employment | equilibrium | investment expenditures | consumption function | marginal propensity to consume | multiplier | fiscal policy | monetary policy | inflation | stagflation | aggregate supply | aggregate market |


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DECISION LAG

The time lag that it takes government leaders and policy makers to determine the appropriate government action needed to address an economic problem. The decision lag arises because it takes time for policy makers to chose among the array of possible policy actions, each with assorted consequences that appeal differently to different political constituencies. This "inside lag" is one of four policy lags associated with monetary and fiscal policy. The other two "inside lags" are recognition lag and implementation lag, and one "outside lag" is implementation lag. All four policy lags can reduce the effectiveness of business-cycle stabilization policies and can even destabilize the economy.

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