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June 14, 2024 

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SCARCE GOOD: A resource with an available quantity less than its desired use. Scarce resources are also called factors of production. Scarce goods are also termed economic goods. Scarce resources are used to produce scarce goods. Like the more general society-wide condition of scarcity, a given resource is scarce because it has a limited availability in combination with a greater (potentially unlimited) productive use. It's both of these that make it scarce. In other words, even though an item is quite limited it will not be a scarce resource if it has few if any uses (think pocket lint and free good).

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THIRD RULE OF INEQUALITY: The third of seven basic rules of the economy. It is a fact of life that resources, income, and wealth are not equally distributed. Some people have more and some people have less. Why is this so? We can look to the age-old distinction between nature and nurture for insight. On the nature side, some people are born with more talents, abilities and intelligence than others, which they use to gain ownership and control of income-generating and wealth-producing resources. On the nurture side, some people work harder to develop skills, acquire education, and uncover opportunities that lead to ownership and control of income-generating and wealth-producing resources (human capital).

     See also | seven rules | resources | income | wealth | income distribution | wealth distribution | ownership and control | equity | education | human capital |


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FACTOR DEMAND

The willingness and ability of productive activities (usually, business firms) to hire or employ factors of production. Factor demand relates factor price and factor quantity, specifically, it is the range of factor quantities that are demanded at a range of factor prices. This is one half of the factor market. The other half is factor supply. The factors of production subject to factor demand include any and all of the four scarce resources--labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship. However, because labor involves human beings directly, it is the factor that tends to receive the most scrutiny and analysis.

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