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GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES: Government owned and operated productive activities that operate much like private sector firms. They hire resources and purchase other inputs, then produce goods that are sold through markets. In some cases, government enterprises compete directly with private firms. One common example of a government enterprise is a city-operated electrical generation and distribution system. In some cities, this service is provided by private, for-profit, businesses and in other cities it is provided by government. Other examples of government enterprises include urban transportation systems, parks and recreational facilities, and communication systems.

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UNEMPLOYMENT SOURCES: The unemployment of resources in general, and labor in particular, can be attributable to four basic reasons, or sources: cyclical, seasonal, frictional, and structural. Cyclical unemployment is involuntary unemployment created by business cycle recessions. Seasonal unemployment is relatively regular, read this as predictable, unemployment tied to a particular job. Frictional unemployment is temporary unemployment created when workers switch jobs. Structural unemployment is relatively permanent unemployment created because workers' skills are not the same as the skills needed on the job.

     See also | unemployment | unemployment rate | cyclical unemployment | seasonal unemployment | frictional unemployment | structural unemployment | natural unemployment | unemployment problems |


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UNEMPLOYMENT SOURCES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: March 2, 2024].


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AGGREGATE SUPPLY

The total (or aggregate) real production of final goods and services available in the domestic economy at a range of price levels, during a given time period. Aggregate supply, usually abbreviated AS, is two different relations between price level and real production--long run and short run. With long-run aggregate supply, prices and wages are flexible and all markets are in equilibrium. With short-run aggregate supply some prices and wage are NOT flexible and some markets are NOT in equilibrium. This is one half of the AS-AD (aggregate market) analysis. The other half is aggregate demand.

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