Google
Monday 
June 27, 2022 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
TOTAL REVENUE CURVE, MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION: A curve that graphically represents the relation between total revenue received by a monopolistically competitive firm for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. It is used with the firm's total cost curve to determine economic profit. The marginal revenue curve, a key factor for determining the profit-maximizing level of a firm's output, is derived directly from the total revenue curve. The slope of this total revenue curve is marginal revenue. This curve is constructed to capture the relation between total revenue and the level of output, holding other variables constant.

Visit the GLOSS*arama


PRICE TAKER:

A buyer or seller that has no market control and is not able to affect the price of a good. It must "take" or accept the going market price. The market structure that exemplifies price taker is perfect competition. In fact, perfect competition is the only example of price taker. This is one of two alternatives related to control over price. The other is price maker. Price taker is also termed price seeker.
The lack of market control is what creates a price taker. A buyer or seller that has NO market control must accept the existing market price when buying or selling a good. It has no choice. Pay the going price and buy the good. Do not pay the going price and do not buy the good. Accept the going price and sell the good. Do not accept the going price and do not sell the good. For a price taker, no other options exist.

Perfect competition is THE example for pricer taker because it contains a relatively large number of participants that trade an identical product. Participants are free to enter and exit the market and everyone has complete knowledge of all prices.

Each buyer competes against thousands, hundreds of thousands, or even millions of other buyers when they seek to purchase a good. Each seller competes against thousands, hundreds of thousands, or even millions of other sellers when they seek to sell a good.

Sellers do not sell to a buyer trying to pay less than going market price, because thousands, or even millions of other buyers are willing and able to pay the going price. Buyers do not buy from a seller trying to charge more than going market price, because thousands, or even millions of other sellers are willing and able to charge the going price.

Each participant is an insignificant part of the overall market. Should a given buyer decide to buy more or less or nothing at all, the market is unaffected. Should a given seller decide to sell more or less or nothing at all, the market is unaffected.

Price-taking buyers and sellers face perfectly elastic demand and supply curves. For example, a perfectly competitive seller faces a perfectly elastic demand curve, one that is horizontal at the market price. It can sell any quantity that it wants at the going market price. A perfectly competitive buyer faces a perfectly elastic supply curve, one that is horizontal at the market price. It can buy any quantity that it wants at the going market price.

Facing a constant market price and perfectly elastic demand or supply curve means that price takers efficiently allocate resources. The value of goods produced is equal to the value of goods not produced.

<= PRICE STABILITYPRINCIPAL-AGENT PROBLEM =>


Recommended Citation:

PRICE TAKER, AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: June 27, 2022].


Check Out These Related Terms...

     | market control | price maker | market structures | market structure continuum | perfect competition | monopoly | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | monopsony | oligopsony | monopsonistic competition |


Or For A Little Background...

     | firm | industry | business | market | efficiency | demand | supply | competition among the few | competition among the many | demand price | supply price |


And For Further Study...

     | bilateral monopoly | duopoly | imperfect competition | perfect competition, efficiency | perfect competition, characteristics | monopoly, efficiency | monopoly, characteristics | monopolistic competition, efficiency | monopolistic competition, characteristics | collusion, efficiency | oligopoly, characteristics |


Search Again?

Back to the WEB*pedia


APLS

BEIGE MUNDORTLE
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for the new strip mall out on the highway hoping to buy either throw pillows for your living room sofa or a hepa filter for your furnace. Be on the lookout for a thesaurus filled with typos.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
"It is very rare that you meet with obstacles in this world (that) the humblest man has not the faculties to surmount. "

-- Henry David Thoreau, philosopher

AASB
American Assocation of Small Business
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2022 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster