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January 22, 2018 

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AMORTIZATION: The process of paying off a debt liability and accrued interest through a series of equal, periodic payments. Car loans and mortgages are two debts commonly paid off through amortization. Your monthly car payment, for example, partially pays for interest accrued on the outstanding balance and partly reduces that balance. Because one payment reduces the outstanding balance, each subsequent payment has a smaller portion for interest. If the proper amortization schedule has been calculated, your loan will be paid off with the last payment.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Method
  • Overview
  • Components
  • A Process
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Theory
  • Concept
  • Abstraction
  • Economic Theories
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Verification
  • Overview & Data
  • Evaluation
  • Evaluation:Don't Agree
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Science and Practice
  • Set Up
  • Theory
  • Verification
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Cause and Effect
  • Purpose
  • An Example
  • Analysis
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Economic Science

    In this lesson you'll see why and how the scientific method is a process of discovery. You'll see that it's a process of building theories to explain the workings of the world (the economy) by proposing then testing hypotheses. The five units making up this lesson will guide you through the basics of the scientific method and how it's used in the study of economics.

    • The first unit, The Method, introduces the scientific method, especially its' four key components -- theories, principles, hypothesis, and data.
    • The second unit, Theory, then takes a closer look at theories, including the central role played by abstraction.
    • In the third unit, Verification, we focus on the process of verification -- how and why hypothesized relationships about the workings of the economy are compared with actual data.
    • We then turn out attention in the fourth unit, Science and Practice, to a simple example of how the scientific method is used to test a hypothesized relation between course grades and where students are seated in a classroom.
    • The fifth and final unit in this lesson, Cause and Effect, examines the role that cause and effect plays in the scientific method and economic science.

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    MARGINAL PROPENSITY FOR GOVERNMENT PURCHASES

    The change in government purchases induced by a change in income or production (national income or gross domestic product). The marginal propensity for government purchases (abbreviated MPG) is another term for the slope of the government purchases line and is calculated as the change in government purchases divided by the change in income or production. The MPG plays a role in Keynesian economics. It augments the slope of the aggregate expenditures line and is part of the multiplier process. A related marginal measure is the marginal propensity to consume.

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    APLS

    PURPLE SMARPHIN
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through the yellow pages seeking to buy either a combination CD player, clock radio, and telephone (with answering machine) or a revolving spice rack. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    Only 1% of the U.S. population paid income taxes when the income tax was established in 1914.
    "Now is the only time there is. Make your now wow, your minutes miracles, and your days pay. Your life will have been magnificently lived and invested, and when you die you will have made a difference."

    -- Mark Victor Hansen

    MGF
    Moment Generating Function
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
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