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MARKET SHOCK: A disruption of market equilibrium (that is, a market adjustment) caused by a change in a demand determinant (and a shift of the demand curve) or a change in a supply determinant (and a shift of the supply curve). A market shock can take one of four forms--an demand increase, demand decrease, supply increase, or supply decrease. An increase is seen as a rightward shift of either curve and results in an increase in equilibrium quantity. A decrease is a leftward shift of either curve and results in a decrease in equilibrium quantity. However, a change in demand results in price and quantity to change in the same direction, while a change in supply causes equilibrium price to move the opposite direction as quantity.

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AUTONOMOUS INVESTMENT: Business investment expenditures that are unrelated to income or production (especially national income or gross national product). These are investment expenditures that would occur even if national income was zero. Autonomous investment is graphically depicted as the vertical intercept of the investment line relating investment to national income. Changes in autonomous investment, along with changes in other autonomous expenditures, are what trigger the multiplier effect.

     See also | investment expenditures | national income | gross domestic product | investment line | autonomous consumption | autonomous expenditure | multiplier | induced investment |


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AUTONOMOUS INVESTMENT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: February 27, 2024].


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GOOD TYPES

The economy produces four distinct types of goods based on two key characteristics -- consumption rivalry and nonpayer excludability. Consumption rivalry arises if consumption of a good by one person prevents another from also consuming. Nonpayer excludability means potential consumers who do not pay for a good can be excluded from consuming. Private goods are rival in consumption and easily subject to the exclusion of nonpayers. Public goods are nonrival in consumption and the exclusion of nonpayers is virtually impossible. Near-public goods are nonrival in consumption and easily subject to exclusion. Common-property goods are rival in consumption and not easily subject to exclusion. Private goods can be efficiently exchanged through markets. Public, near-public and common-property goods cannot, but require some degree of government involvement for efficiency.

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