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March 4, 2024 

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IN-KIND PAYMENT: A payment, usually in exchange for the productive efforts of resources, that takes the form of goods and services rather than the economy's standard monetary unit (that is, dollars). In other words, resource owners are compensated with a portion of the output that they helped to produce. The standard method of compensation, which is illustrated by the circular flow model, is for a firm to pay resource owners using money revenue received from selling its production. Hence most factor payments are monetary payments. However, in some circumstances firms and resource owners find it more convenient to use actual production for compensation, eliminating the middle sell-production-for-money step

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INCENTIVE: A cost or benefit that motivates a decision or action by consumers, businesses, or other participants in the economy. Some incentives are explicitly created by government policies to achieve a desired end or they can just be part of the wacky world we call economics. The most noted incentive in the study of economics is that provided by prices. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the . When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation system that society uses to answer the three questions of allocation.

     See also | cost | consumer | business | economic policies | price | allocation | three questions of allocation | efficiency | invisible hand |


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INCENTIVE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: March 4, 2024].


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INFLATION CAUSES

Inflation, the persistent increase in the average price level, can be caused by an increase in aggregate demand or a decrease in aggregate supply. This suggests two basics sources, causes, or types of inflation--demand-pull inflation and cost-push inflation. While short-term bouts of inflation (up to several months) can result from anything (determinant) that might cause either increases in aggregate demand or decreases in aggregate supply, long-term inflation (a year or more) is possible ONLY through persistent increases in the money supply. As such, while demand-pull inflation and cost-push inflation are convenient ways to catalog the transmission mechanisms of inflation, the ultimate CAUSE of inflation is money.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through mail order catalogs seeking to buy either a birthday gift for your grandmother or a T-shirt commemorating yesterday. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
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