Google
Sunday 
April 14, 2024 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
WEALTH DISTRIBUTION: The manner in which wealth is divided among the members of the economy. A perfectly equal wealth distribution would mean everyone in the country has exactly the same wealth. In reality, wealth is unequally distributed. A few people have a great deal of wealth and most others have less. Any well-functioning economy, that's doing a pretty good job of satisfying consumer wants and needs, will have some degree of inequality in the distribution of wealth. This occurs because some people have done a good job of producing what people want, and thus grow wealthy. However, wealth tends to perpetuate itself, over and above what may be justified by valuable production. Along with wealth comes market control, political power, and the ability to accumulate more wealth at the expense of others.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

INJECTION-LEAKAGE MODEL: A model used in Keynesian economics based on the equality of non-consumption expenditures (or injections) and non-consumption uses of income (leakages). On one side of the equality is saving, taxes, and imports -- the non-consumption leakages. On the other side of the equality is investment, government purchases, and exports -- the non-consumption injections. The injection-leakage model provides an alternative to the Keynesian cross for identifying equilibrium aggregate output.

     See also | Keynesian economics | injection | leakage | saving | tax | import | investment expenditures | government purchases | export | Keynesian cross | circular flow |


Recommended Citation:

INJECTION-LEAKAGE MODEL, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: April 14, 2024].


Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

DECREASING RETURNS TO SCALE

A given proportional change in all resources in the long run results in a proportional smaller change in production. Decreasing returns to scale exists if a firm increases ALL resources--labor, capital, and other inputs--by a given proportion (say 10 percent) and output increases by less than this proportion (that is, less than 10 percent). This is one of three returns to scale. The other two are increasing returns to scale and constant returns to scale.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

RED AGGRESSERINE
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store hoping to buy either a birthday greeting card for your father or a T-shirt commemorating the first day of spring. Be on the lookout for slightly overweight pizza delivery guys.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
"Success doesn't come to you . . . you go to it "

-- Marva Collins, Educator

ISIC
International Standard Industrial Classification
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2024 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster