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AD CURVE: The aggregate demand curve, which is a graphical representation of the relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate demand determinants constant. The aggregate demand, or AD, curve is one side of the graphical presentation of the aggregate market. The other side is occupied by the aggregate supply curve (which is actually two curves, the long-run aggregate supply curve and the short-run aggregate supply curve). The negative slope of the aggregate demand curve captures the inverse relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level. This negative slope is attributable to the interest-rate effect, real-balance effect, and net-export effect.

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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION: A curve that graphically represents the relation between marginal factor cost incurred by a perfectly competitive firm for hiring an input and the quantity of input employed. A profit-maximizing perfectly competitive firm hires the quantity of input found at the intersection of the marginal factor cost curve and marginal revenue product curve. The marginal factor cost curve for a perfectly competitive firm with no market control is horizontal.

     See also | marginal factor cost | marginal factor cost curve | marginal factor cost curve, monopsony | total factor cost curve | average factor cost curve | total cost | total product | marginal factor cost, perfect competition | marginal factor cost, monopsony |


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ACCOUNTING PROFIT

The difference between the revenue received by a firm and the explicit accounting cost incurred. This is the profit listed on a firm's balance sheet, appears periodically in the financial sector of the newspaper, and is reported to the Internal Revenue Service for tax purposes. While accounting profit is the "standard" designation of profit used in the business world, economists prefer to use economic profit

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