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June 17, 2024 

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WORKERS' COMPENSATION: A government-run insurance program that provides benefits to workers injured on the job. Funding for these benefits come from premiums paid by employers. The federal government mandates the program, but it's administered by each of the states. This creates a great deal of diversity, with some states having good benefits and high premiums (sort of pro labor), while others have lousy benefits and low premiums (pro business). In addition to differences among states, premiums also differ based on a business's historical record of accidents. Those companies with a higher number of industrial accidents pay more in premiums than those with fewer accidents.

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MARGINAL FACTOR COST, PERFECT COMPETITION: The change in total factor cost resulting from a change in the quantity of factor input employed by a perfectly competitive firm. Marginal factor cost, abbreviated MFC, indicates how total factor cost changes with the employment of one more input. It is found by dividing the change in total factor cost by the change in the quantity of input used. Marginal factor cost is compared with marginal revenue product to identify the profit-maximizing quantity of input to hire.

     See also | marginal factor cost | marginal factor cost curve, perfect competition | marginal factor cost, monopsony | total factor cost | marginal factor cost curve | average factor cost curve | total cost | total product | total factor cost, perfect competition | total factor cost, monopsony |


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INTERNATIONAL TRADE

The exchange of goods and services among the nations of the world. Also termed foreign trade when viewed from the perspective of a given country, the international exchange of production is comparable to any exchange, except that buyers and sellers are from different countries. The study of international trade highlights an important economic principle, the law of comparative advantage, which helps to explain not only why nations engage in trade but why individuals engage in trade. A related area of study is international finance, both of which are part of the broader study of international economics.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at an auction hoping to buy either a birthday greeting card for your grandmother or a coffee cup commemorating yesterday. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
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In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us. "

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