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December 9, 2022 

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LEGAL TYPES: The three primary types of legal firm organizations are: (1) proprietorship, (2) partnership, and (3) corporation. One primary difference between these three legal types are number of owners -- proprietorship has one, partnership has two or more (but usually a small number), and corporation can have anywhere from one or to millions. A second difference is the liability of the owners -- proprietorship and partnership owners have unlimited liability and corporation owners have limited liability. Three newer firm types include (1) limited partnership, (2) S corporation, and (3) limited liability company. Each of these three are hybrids, with characteristics of proprietorship, partnership, corporation.

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PERFECT COMPETITION AND EFFICIENCY: Perfect competition is the idealized market structure that achieves an efficient allocation of resources. The conditions of perfect competition, including (1) large number of small firms, (2) identical products sold by all firms, (3) freedom of entry into and exit out of the industry, and (4) perfect knowledge of prices and technology, ensure that perfect competition efficiently allocates resources. This is in fact the purpose of perfect competition: a market structure that illustrates perfection, the best of all possible resource allocation worlds. The real world falls short of this perfection.

     See also | perfect competition | efficiency | market structure | resource allocation | imperfect competition | monopoly | oligopoly | monopolistic competition |


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PERFECT COMPETITION AND EFFICIENCY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: December 9, 2022].


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE, MONOPSONY

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average factor cost incurred by a firm for employing an input and the quantity of input used. Because average factor cost is essentially the price of the input, the average factor cost curve is also the supply curve for the input. The average factor cost curve for a firm with no market control is horizontal. The average factor cost curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a crowded estate auction wanting to buy either a video game player or an AC adapter that won't fry your computer. Be on the lookout for high interest rates.
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The 1909 Lincoln penny was the first U.S. coin with the likeness of a U.S. President.
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