Google
Tuesday 
May 11, 2021 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
FACE VALUE: The stated, or face, value of a legal claim or financial asset. For debt securities, such as corporate bonds or U. S. Treasury securities, this is amount to be repaid at the time of maturity. For equity securities, that is, corporate stocks, this is the initial value set up at the time it is issued. Face value, also called par value, is not necessarily, and often is not, equal to the current market price of the asset. A $10,000 U.S. Treasury note, for example, has a face value of $10,000, but might have a current market price of $9,950. The difference between face value and current price contributes to the yield or return on such assets. An asset is selling at a discount if the current price is less than the face value and is selling at a premium if the current price is more than the par value.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

PRIVATE PROPERTY: A fundamental economic institution in which resources (property) are owned and controlled by households and businesses (the private sector) rather than government (the public sector). Private property provides critical incentives for the efficient operation of competitive market and a market-oriented economy. Under private-property ownership, control over resources is relinquished (that is sold) when the owners are compensated for their opportunity costs. And this is just the sort of thing that leads to an efficient use of resources.

     See also | institution | resources | ownership and control | household | business | private sector | government | public sector | efficiency | competitive market | market-oriented economy | opportunity cost |


Recommended Citation:

PRIVATE PROPERTY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2021. [Accessed: May 11, 2021].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: private property

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS

A theory of macroeconomics developed by John Maynard Keynes based on the proposition that aggregate demand is the primary source of business-cycle instability and the most important cause of recessions. Keynesian economics points to discretionary government policies, especially fiscal policy, as the primary means of stabilizing business cycles and tends to be favored by those on the liberal end of the political spectrum. The basic principles of Keynesian economics were developed by Keynes in his book, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, published in 1936. This work launched the modern study of macroeconomics and served as a guide for both macroeconomic theory and macroeconomic policies for four decades. Although it fell out of favor in the 1980s, Keynesian principles remain important to modern macroeconomic theories, especially aggregate market (AS-AD) analysis.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

GRAY SKITTERY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store seeking to buy either hand lotion, a big bottle of hand lotion or a lighted magnifying glass. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The average length of a "business lunch" is about 36 minutes.
"Everyone is bound to bear patiently the results of his own example. "

-- Phaedrus, Philosopher

CME
Chicago Mercantile Exchange
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2021 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster