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DISPOSABLE INCOME AND PERSONAL INCOME: Disposable income (DI) is the total income that can be used by the household sector for either consumption or saving during a given period of time, usually one year. Personal income (PI) is the total income received by the members of the domestic household sector, which may or may not be earned from productive activities during a given period of time, usually one year. Disposable income is after-tax income that is officially calculated as the difference between personal income and personal tax and nontax payments. In the numbers game, personal tax and nontax payments are about 15 percent of personal income, which makes disposable personal income about 85 percent of personal income.

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PROFIT: As a generic term, this is the difference between revenue and cost. There are, however, three specific sorts of profit, each with a different meaning. Accounting profit is the difference between revenue and accounting expenses. Economic profit is the difference between revenue and the opportunity cost of production. Normal profit is the economic profit that could be earned by an entrepreneur in another business and is thus an opportunity cost deducted from revenue when calculating economic profit.

     See also | total revenue | total cost | accounting profit | economic profit | normal profit | opportunity cost | profit maximization | profit curve | entrepreneurship | corporate profits |


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PROFIT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: July 1, 2022].


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AGGREGATE DEMAND CURVE

A graphical representation of the relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate demand determinants constant. The aggregate demand (AD) curve is one side of the graphical presentation of the aggregate market. The other side is occupied by the long-run aggregate supply curve and/or the short-run aggregate supply curve. The negative slope of the aggregate demand curve captures the inverse relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level. This negative slope is attributable to the interest-rate, real-balance, and net-export effects.

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BROWN PRAGMATOX
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center trying to buy either clothing for your kitty cats or a set of luggage without wheels. Be on the lookout for infected paper cuts.
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Post WWI induced hyperinflation in German in the early 1900s raised prices by 726 million times from 1918 to 1923.
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MR
Marginal Revenue
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