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NET EXPORTS LINE: The graphical depiction of the relation between net exports and national income (or gross domestic product) that plays a role in Keynesian economics and the Keynesian cross. The net exports line is derived by combining the exports line, relating exports and national income, with the imports line, relating imports and national income. Because exports are largely independent of national income and imports (which are subtracted from exports) increase with national income, the net exports line has a negative slope. The slope of the net exports line is thus the negative of the marginal propensity to import. The aggregate expenditures line used in the Keynesian cross is obtained by adding this net exports line, as well as, government purchases and net exports, to the consumption line. The government purchases line is also combined with investment expenditures for the Keynesian saving-investment model.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Concept
  • What It Is
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Doing More
  • Expenditures
  • Consumption Expenditures
  • Investment Expenditures
  • Government Purchases
  • Net Exports
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: The Curve
  • Highlights
  • Slope
  • Real-Balance Effect
  • Interest-Rate Effect
  • Net-Export Effect
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Instability
  • Shifts: Increase
  • Shifts: Decrease
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Policies Plus
  • Business Cycles
  • Policies
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Aggregate Demand

    This lesson introduces aggregate demand, the demand-side of the aggregate market. The aggregate market is the key model used to explain and analyze the workings of the macroeconomy and aggregate demand is a critical half of this model (the other is aggregate supply). Taking a clue from market demand, this lesson examines the nature of aggregate demand, including the relation between the price level and aggregate expenditures, the reason the aggregate demand curve is negatively sloped, and the assorted aggregate demand determinants that cause the aggregate demand curve to shift.

    • The first unit of this lesson introduces the concept of aggregate demand and how it fits into the study of macroeconomics in terms of the aggregate market and circular flow.
    • In the second unit, we example the four aggregate expenditures -- consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports -- the make up aggregate demand.
    • The third unit then examines the aggregate demand curve that captures the aggregate demand relation between the price level and aggregate expenditures, especially the importance of the real-balance, interest-rate, and net-export effects.
    • A look at the assorted aggregate demand determinants that shift the aggregate demand curves is the topic of the fourth lesson.
    • We end this lesson in the fifth unit with a look how demand-management policies work to stabilize business cycles through aggregate demand.

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    SELF CORRECTION, RECESSIONARY GAP

    The automatic process in which the aggregate market eliminates a recessionary gap created by a short-run equilibrium that is less than full employment through decreases in wages (and other resource prices). The self-correction mechanism is triggered by short-run resource market imbalances that are closed by long-run price flexibility. The self-correction process of the aggregate market also acts to close an inflationary gap with higher wages (and other resource prices).

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