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December 13, 2018 

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RISK LOVING: A person who values a certain income less than an equal amount of income that involves risk or uncertainty. Suppose that you have two options--(A) a guaranteed $1,000 or (b) a 50-50 chance of getting either $500 or $1,500. If you chose option B, then you're risk loving. While both options give you the same "expected" values, you get more satisfaction from the risky option than the guaranteed one. In fact, risk loving people are willing to pay for the opportunity to experience a risky situation.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Concept
  • What It Is
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Doing More
  • Expenditures
  • Consumption Expenditures
  • Investment Expenditures
  • Government Purchases
  • Net Exports
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: The Curve
  • Highlights
  • Slope
  • Real-Balance Effect
  • Interest-Rate Effect
  • Net-Export Effect
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Instability
  • Shifts: Increase
  • Shifts: Decrease
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Policies Plus
  • Business Cycles
  • Policies
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Aggregate Demand

    This lesson introduces aggregate demand, the demand-side of the aggregate market. The aggregate market is the key model used to explain and analyze the workings of the macroeconomy and aggregate demand is a critical half of this model (the other is aggregate supply). Taking a clue from market demand, this lesson examines the nature of aggregate demand, including the relation between the price level and aggregate expenditures, the reason the aggregate demand curve is negatively sloped, and the assorted aggregate demand determinants that cause the aggregate demand curve to shift.

    • The first unit of this lesson introduces the concept of aggregate demand and how it fits into the study of macroeconomics in terms of the aggregate market and circular flow.
    • In the second unit, we example the four aggregate expenditures -- consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports -- the make up aggregate demand.
    • The third unit then examines the aggregate demand curve that captures the aggregate demand relation between the price level and aggregate expenditures, especially the importance of the real-balance, interest-rate, and net-export effects.
    • A look at the assorted aggregate demand determinants that shift the aggregate demand curves is the topic of the fourth lesson.
    • We end this lesson in the fifth unit with a look how demand-management policies work to stabilize business cycles through aggregate demand.

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    EQUALITY STANDARD

    An income distribution standard in which income is divided equally among members of society. This is one of three basic income distribution standards that answers the For Whom? question of allocation. The other two are the contributive standard and the needs standard.

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