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March 1, 2024 

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ECONOMIC RECOVERY TAX ACT: Unofficially called the Kemp-Roth, this was a cornerstone of economic policy under President Reagan passed in 1981. The three components of this act were: (1) a decrease in individual income taxes, phased in over three years, (2) a decrease in business taxes, primarily through changes in capital depreciation, and (3) the indexing of taxes to inflation, which was implemented in 1985. This act was intended to address the stagflation problems of high unemployment and high inflation that existed during that 1970s and to provide greater incentives for investment. A primary theoretical justification is found in the Laffer curve relation between tax rates and total tax collections.

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CAPITAL DEPRECIATION: The wearing out, breaking down, or technological obsolescence of physical capital that results from use in the production of goods and services. To paraphrase an old saying, "You can't make a car without breaking a few socket wrenches." In other words, when capital is used over and over again to produce goods and services, it wears down from such use.

     See also | capital consumption adjustment | net national product | national income | personal income | disposable income | gross national product | real gross domestic product | net domestic product | gross domestic product | production | gross private domestic investment | net private domestic investment | capital | investment | investment expenditures | National Income and Product Accounts | Bureau of Economic Analysis | National Bureau of Economic Research | macroeconomic problems | macroeconomic theories | macroeconomic sectors | circular flow | business cycles | stabilization policies | gross domestic product, ins and outs | gross domestic product, expenditures | gross domestic product, income | net foreign factor income |


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CAPITAL DEPRECIATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: March 1, 2024].


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AGGREGATE DEMAND

The total real expenditures on final goods and services produced in the domestic economy that buyers are willing and able to undertake at different price levels, during a given time period (usually a year). Aggregate demand, usually abbreviated AD, is an inverse relation between price level and aggregate expenditures. This is one half of the AS-AD (aggregate market) analysis. The other half is aggregate supply. Aggregate demand consists of four aggregate expenditures--consumption expenditures, investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports--made by the four macroeconomic sectors--household, business, government, and foreign.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for rummage sales trying to buy either a handcrafted bird feeder or a New York Yankees baseball cap. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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In the early 1900s around 300 automobile companies operated in the United States.
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