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June 16, 2024 

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LRMC CURVE: The common abbreviation for the long-run marginal cost curve, which is the graphical representation of the relationship between long-run marginal cost and the quantity of output produced. Like other marginal curves, the long-run marginal cost curve follows the average-marginal rule relative to the long-run average cost curve. In all outward appearance, the long-run marginal cost curve looks very much like the short-run marginal cost, that is, it is U-shaped. However, the U-shape is attributable to returns to scale rather than increasing and decreasing marginal returns.

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DEMAND-DRIVEN BUSINESS CYCLES: Business cycle instability caused by changes in one or more of the four aggregate demand expenditures on gross domestic product--consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports. This is one of two basic types of business cycles; the other being supply-drive business cycle. Demand-driven business cycles tend to be the more common of the two types. In general, demand-driven business cycles are more responsible for short-term instability, while supply-driven business cycles tend to be more closely associated with long-run changes in the economy.

     See also | business cycle | aggregate demand | aggregate expenditures | gross domestic product | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports | investment business cycle | political business cycle | stabilization policies |


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average factor cost incurred by a firm for employing an input and the quantity of input used. Because average factor cost is essentially the price of the input, the average factor cost curve is also the supply curve for the input. The average factor cost curve for a firm with no market control is horizontal. The average revenue curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped.

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