March 17, 2018 

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WILLINGNESS TO ACCEPT: The price or dollar amount that someone is willing to receive or accept to give up a good or service. Willingness to accept is the source of the supply price of a good. However, unlike supply price, in which sellers are on the spot of actually giving up a good to receive payment, willingness to accept does not require an actual exchange. This concept is important to benefit-cost analysis, welfare economics, and efficiency criteria, especially Kaldor-Hicks efficiency. A related concept is willingness to pay.

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NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SECURITIES DEALERS: A stock market in which corporate stocks are exchanged by dealers across the country using a computerized system of stock price quotes. This is often referred to as the "over-the-counter" stock market, because, unlike the New York Stock Exchange, the American Stock Exchange, and others, the dealers don't conduct their business at a single location. They match up their buy and sell orders through a computer network rather than through the face-to-face contact. Transactions conducted by the NASD give rise to one of the more commonly publicized stock market price indicators, the NASDAQ (which stands for National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation). The widely used NASDAQ composite index is based on the prices of 5,000 of these over-the-counter stocks.

     See also | stock market | corporate stock | NASDAQ | New York Stock Exchange | American Stock Exchange | index | Dow Jones averages | Standard & Poor's 500 |

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One of several specific aggregate supply determinants assumed constant when the short-run and long-run aggregate supply curves are constructed, and that shifts both aggregate supply curves when it changes. An increase in technology causes an increase (rightward shift) of both aggregate supply curves. A decrease in technology causes a decrease (leftward shift) of both aggregate supply curves. Other notable aggregate supply determinants include wages, energy prices, and the capital stock. Technology comes under the resource quality aggregate supply determinant.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time waiting for visits from door-to-door solicitors seeking to buy either arch supports for your shoes or an AC adapter that works with your MPG player. Be on the lookout for poorly written technical manuals.
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Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen were the 1st Nobel Prize winners in Economics in 1969.
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