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YIELD CURVE: A curve plotting the yields (or returns) on securities with different maturity lengths. The standard yield is for U.S. Treasury securities with lengths ranging from 90 days to 30 years. The five maturity lengths are usually 90 day, 180 day, 2 year, 5 year, 10 year, and 30 year. The shape and slope fo the yield curve indicates the state of the economy and what's likely to come. A normal yield curve has a slight positive slope, with slightly higher yields for longer maturity securities. A steep yield curve suggests the end of a contraction and beginning of an expansion. An inverted, or negatively sloped yield curve is the sign of an upcoming contraction.

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CHANGE IN AGGREGATE SUPPLY: A shift of the short-run or long-run aggregate supply curve caused by a change in one of the aggregate supply determinants. In essence, a change in aggregate supply is caused by any factor affecting supply EXCEPT the price level. This concept should be contrasted directly with a change in real production. You might also want to review the terms change in quantity supplied and change in supply, as well. The change in aggregate supply is comparable to the change in market supply. A change in aggregate supply is a change in ALL price level-real production combinations, meaning that each price level is matched up with a different level of real production (which is then illustrated as a shift of the short-run or long-run aggregate supply curve). This change in aggregate supply is caused by a change in any of the aggregate supply determinants. In contrast, a change in real production is a change from one price level-real production combination to the another.

     See also | aggregate supply | long-run aggregate supply curve | short-run aggregate supply curve | aggregate supply determinants | price level | real production | change in real production | change in quantity supplied | change in supply | market supply |


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CHANGE IN AGGREGATE SUPPLY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: August 19, 2019].


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MARGINAL REVENUE, PERFECT COMPETITION

The change in total revenue resulting from a change in the quantity of output sold. Marginal revenue indicates how much extra revenue a perfectly competitive firm receives for selling an extra unit of output. It is found by dividing the change in total revenue by the change in the quantity of output. Marginal revenue is the slope of the total revenue curve and is one of two revenue concepts derived from total revenue. The other is average revenue. To maximize profit, a perfectly competitive firm equates marginal revenue and marginal cost.

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