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SCARCE GOOD: A resource with an available quantity less than its desired use. Scarce resources are also called factors of production. Scarce goods are also termed economic goods. Scarce resources are used to produce scarce goods. Like the more general society-wide condition of scarcity, a given resource is scarce because it has a limited availability in combination with a greater (potentially unlimited) productive use. It's both of these that make it scarce. In other words, even though an item is quite limited it will not be a scarce resource if it has few if any uses (think pocket lint and free good).

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LONG-RUN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE: A graphical representation of the long-run relation between real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate supply determinants constant. The long-run aggregate supply, or LRAS, curve is one of two curves that graphical capture the supply-side of the aggregate market; the other is the short-run aggregate supply curve (SRAS). The demand-side of the aggregate market is occupied by the aggregate demand curve. The vertical LRAS curve captures the independent relation between real production and the price level that exists in the long run.

     See also | long-run aggregate supply | aggregate market | long-run aggregate market | full employment | price level | real production | flexible prices | aggregate demand | short-run aggregate supply | economic growth | business cycles | unemployment | inflation |


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LONG-RUN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: July 4, 2022].


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between marginal factor cost incurred by a perfectly competitive firm for hiring an input and the quantity of input employed. A profit-maximizing perfectly competitive firm hires the quantity of input found at the intersection of the marginal factor cost curve and marginal revenue product curve. The marginal factor cost curve for a perfectly competitive firm with no market control is horizontal.

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