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AGGREGATE MARKET EQUILIBRIUM: The state of equilibrium that exists in the aggregate market when real aggregate expenditures are equal to real production with no imbalances to induce changes in the price level or real production. In other words, the opposing forces of aggregate demand (the buyers) and aggregate supply (the sellers) exactly offset each other. The four macroeconomic sector (household, business, government, and foreign) buyers purchase all of the real production that they seek at the existing price level and business-sector producers sell all of the real production that they have at the existing price level. The aggregate market equilibrium actually comes in two forms: (1) long-run equilibrium, in which all three aggregated markets (product, financial, and resource) are in equilibrium and (2) short-run equilibrium, in which the product and financial markets are in equilibrium, but the resource markets are not.

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LONG-RUN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE: A graphical representation of the long-run relation between real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate supply determinants constant. The long-run aggregate supply, or LRAS, curve is one of two curves that graphical capture the supply-side of the aggregate market; the other is the short-run aggregate supply curve (SRAS). The demand-side of the aggregate market is occupied by the aggregate demand curve. The vertical LRAS curve captures the independent relation between real production and the price level that exists in the long run.

     See also | long-run aggregate supply | aggregate market | long-run aggregate market | full employment | price level | real production | flexible prices | aggregate demand | short-run aggregate supply | economic growth | business cycles | unemployment | inflation |


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OLIGOPOLY AND MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION

Oligopoly and monopolistic competition have some similarities, but also have a few important differences. Both are examples of imperfect competition on the market structure continuum between ideals of perfect competition and monopoly. However, oligopoly contains a small number of large firms and monopolistic competition contains a large number of small firms. The dividing line between oligopoly and monopolistic competition can be blurred due to the number of firms in the industry.

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