Google
Monday 
June 24, 2024 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
DECISION LAG: The time lag that it takes government leaders and policy makers to determine the appropriate government action needed to address an economic problem. The decision lag arises because it takes time for policy makers to chose among the array of possible policy actions, each with assorted consequences that appeal differently to different political constituencies. This "inside lag" is one of four policy lags associated with monetary and fiscal policy. The other two "inside lags" are recognition lag and implementation lag, and one "outside lag" is implementation lag. All four policy lags can reduce the effectiveness of business-cycle stabilization policies and can even destabilize the economy.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

INFLATION: A persistent increase in the average price level in the economy. Inflation occurs when the AVERAGE price level (that is, prices IN GENERAL) increases over time. This does NOT mean that ALL prices increase the same, nor that ALL prices necessarily increase. Some prices might increase a lot, others a little, and still other prices decrease or remain unchanged. Inflation results when the AVERAGE of these assorted prices follows an upward trend. Inflation is the most common phenomenon associated with the price level.

     See also | price level | business cycle | unemployment | Consumer Price Index | GDP price deflator | deflation | disinflation | inflation causes | cost-push inflation | demand-pull inflation | money | inflation problems | inflation rate | inflationary gap |


Recommended Citation:

INFLATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: June 24, 2024].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: inflation

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

INELASTIC SUPPLY

The general elasticity relation in which relatively large changes in price cause relatively small changes in quantity supplied. Large changes in price cause relatively small changes in quantity supplied or the percentage change in quantity supplied is smaller than the percentage change in price. This characterization of elasticity is most important for the price elasticity of supply. Inelastic supply is one of two general elasticity relations for supply. The other is elastic supply.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

PURPLE SMARPHIN
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store hoping to buy either a video game player or an AC adapter that won't fry your computer. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from former employers.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

A lump of pure gold the size of a matchbox can be flattened into a sheet the size of a tennis court!
"It is not fair to ask of others what you are unwilling to do yourself. "

-- Eleanor Roosevelt, diplomat, activist

SMSA
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2024 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster