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March 21, 2019 

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LAFFER CURVE: The graphical inverted-U relation between tax rates and total tax collections by government. Developed by economist Arthur Laffer, the Laffer curve formed a key theoretical foundation for supply-side economics of President Reagan during the 1980s. It is based on the notion that government collects zero revenue if the tax rate is 0% and if the tax rate is 100%. At a 100% tax rate no one has the incentive to work, produce, and earn income, so there is no income to tax. As such, the optimum tax rate, in which government revenue is maximized, lies somewhere between 0% and 100%. This generates a curve shaped like and inverted U, rising from zero to a peak, then falling back to zero. If the economy is operating to the right of the peak, then government revenue can be increased by decreasing the tax rate. This was used to justify supply-side economic policies during the Reagan Administration, especially the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 (Kemp-Roth Act).

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CONSUMER PRICE INDEX: An index of prices of goods and services typically purchased by urban consumers. The Consumer Price Index, commonly known by its abbreviation, CPI, is compiled and published monthly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), using price data obtained from an elaborate survey of 25,000 retail outlets and quantity data generated by the Consumer Expenditures Survey. The CPI is unquestionably one of the most widely recognized macroeconomic price indexes, running second only to the Dow Jones averages in the price index popularity contest. It is used not only as an indicator of the price level and inflation, but also to convert nominal economic indicators to real terms and to adjust wage and income payments (such as Social Security) for inflation.

     See also | price level | index | consumer | Bureau of Labor Statistics | inflation | nominal | real | wage | income | Social Security | GDP price deflator | Producer Price Index | Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers | Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers |


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CONSUMER PRICE INDEX, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: March 21, 2019].


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PRICE MAKER

A buyer or seller that possess sufficient market control to affect the price of the good. From the selling side of the market, a monopoly is the best example of a price maker. From the buying side of the market, a monopsony is also a price maker. This is one of two alternatives related to control over price. The other is price taker. Price maker is also termed price setter.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers trying to buy either a how-to book on fixing your computer, with illustrations or several magazines on computer software. Be on the lookout for poorly written technical manuals.
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In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
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