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June 15, 2024 

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YIELD: The rate of return on a financial asset. In some simple cases, the yield on a financial asset, like commercial paper, corporate bond, or government security, is the asset's interest rate. However, as a more general rule, the yield includes both the interest earned from an asset plus any changes in the asset's price. Suppose, for example, that a $100,000 bond has a 10 percent interest rate, such that the holder receives $10,000 interest per year. If the price of the bond increases over the course of the year from $100,000 to $105,000, then the bond's yield is greater than 10 percent. It includes the $10,000 interest plus the $5,000 bump in the price, giving a yield of 15 percent. Because bonds and similar financial assets often have fixed interest payments, their prices and subsequently yields move up and down as economic conditions change.

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BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS: An agency of the U.S. Federal government, specifically a branch of the U.S. Department of Labor, that compiles and reports a wide range of economic data and measurements. At the top of their list of important economic numbers maintained by what is abbreviated the BLS, are the unemployment rate (and related measures) and the Consumer Price Index (and related measures). Economists rely heavily on the BLS to provide data needed to evaluate and analyze the macroeconomy.

     See also | unemployment rate | Consumer Price Index | unemployment | inflation | price level |


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TOTAL PRODUCT AND MARGINAL PRODUCT

A mathematical connection between marginal product and total product stating that marginal product IS the slope of the total product curve. If the total product curve has a positive slope (that is, is upward sloping), then marginal product is positive. If the total product curve has a negative slope (downward sloping), then marginal product is negative. If the total product curve has a zero slope (horizontal), then marginal product is zero.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction looking to buy either a graduation present for your niece or nephew or a toaster oven that has convection cooking. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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The first paper notes printed in the United States were in denominations of 1 cent, 5 cents, 25 cents, and 50 cents.
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