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December 12, 2018 

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THIRD RULE OF INEQUALITY: The third of seven basic rules of the economy. It is a fact of life that resources, income, and wealth are not equally distributed. Some people have more and some people have less. Why is this so? We can look to the age-old distinction between nature and nurture for insight. On the nature side, some people are born with more talents, abilities and intelligence than others, which they use to gain ownership and control of income-generating and wealth-producing resources. On the nurture side, some people work harder to develop skills, acquire education, and uncover opportunities that lead to ownership and control of income-generating and wealth-producing resources (human capital).

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DEMAND-PULL INFLATION: Demand-pull inflation places responsibility for inflation squarely on the shoulders of increases in aggregate demand. This type of inflation results when the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) collectively try to purchase more output that the economy is capable of producing. In general, increasing aggregate demand means buyers want more production than the economy is able to provide. Then end result is that buyers bid up the price of existing production. The extra demand "pulls" the price level higher. You might want to compare demand-pull inflation with cost-push inflation.

     See also | inflation | aggregate demand | household sector | business sector | government sector | foreign sector | aggregate expenditures | cost-push inflation | production possibilities frontier | aggregate market | long-run aggregate supply curve | aggregate demand curve | shortage | price level |


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DEMAND-PULL INFLATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: December 12, 2018].


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DIAMOND-WATER PARADOX

The apparently conflicting and perplexing observation that water, which is more useful than diamonds, has a lower price than diamonds. This paradox was proposed by economists in the 1800s as a means understanding the role utility plays in the demand price of a good by differentiating between total utility and marginal utility.

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YELLOW CHIPPEROON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store seeking to buy either a rotisserie oven that can also toast bread or a flower arrangement in a coffee cup for your father. Be on the lookout for door-to-door salesmen.
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This isn't me! What am I?

Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice in Wonderland, was the pseudonym of Charles Dodgson, an accomplished mathematician and economist.
"Defeat is simply a signal to press onward."

-- Helen Keller, lecturer, author

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