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April 25, 2018 

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AGGREGATE MARKET EQUILIBRIUM: The state of equilibrium that exists in the aggregate market when real aggregate expenditures are equal to real production with no imbalances to induce changes in the price level or real production. In other words, the opposing forces of aggregate demand (the buyers) and aggregate supply (the sellers) exactly offset each other. The four macroeconomic sector (household, business, government, and foreign) buyers purchase all of the real production that they seek at the existing price level and business-sector producers sell all of the real production that they have at the existing price level. The aggregate market equilibrium actually comes in two forms: (1) long-run equilibrium, in which all three aggregated markets (product, financial, and resource) are in equilibrium and (2) short-run equilibrium, in which the product and financial markets are in equilibrium, but the resource markets are not.

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ECONOMIES OF SCOPE: A production process in which it is cheaper to produce two (or more) products together rather than separately. This property is also termed joint production. For example the production of beef also results in the production of leather and the production of lumber also results in the production of sawdust. Economies of scope can be beneficial, that is, giving a producer multiple products to sell. But it can also be problematic when one of the joint products is undesirable, such as pollution or waste residual.

     See also | complement-in-production | joint product | externality | pollution | joint production |


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CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT

Interest-paying bank accounts maintained by traditional commercial banks, credit unions, savings and loan associations, and mutual savings banks that stipulate a fixed interest rate and the length of maturity before the funds can be withdrawn. Certificates of deposit (CDs) pay a higher interest rate than regular savings accounts, but the funds cannot be withdraw at the full interest rate until the maturity date. These are one of two types of time deposits. The other is savings deposits. Certificates of deposit, along with savings deposits and other near monies, are added to M1 to derive M2.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center wanting to buy either a 50 foot extension cord or a combination CD player, clock radio, and telephone (with answering machine). Be on the lookout for cardboard boxes.
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