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LABOR UNION MOVEMENT: Activities on the part of workers in the United States, beginning in the mid-1800s and extending into the mid-1900s, to establish labor unions and otherwise promote the interests of workers. This movement, which coincided with the onset of the U.S. industrial revolution, was launched with the Commonwealth versus Hunt court decision in 1842 which made it legal to join a labor union. The labor union movement had a turbulent and violent history as organized labor sought to gain greater control over labor market activities. The movement reached its peak in the 1950s, with just under 30% of the labor force belonging to labor unions.

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GEOGRAPHIC MOBILITY: The mobility, or movement, of factors of production from a productive activity in one location to a productive activity in another location. In particular, geographic mobility is the ease with which resources can change locations. For example, a worker leaves a job in one city and takes a job in another city. Some factors are highly mobile and thus are easily moved between cities, states, and even countries. Other factors are highly immobile and not easily relocated. You might want to compare geographic mobility with occupation mobility, the movement of factors from one type of productive activity to another type of productive activity.

     See also | mobility | occupational mobility | labor | factor markets | compensating wages | migration |


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INVESTMENT, PRODUCTION POSSIBILITIES

Investment typically refers to the purchase of productive capital by business in anticipation of increasing production and (presumably) generating more profit. More generally, investment can be considered as sacrificing the current satisfaction of wants and needs (consumption goods) to expand productive capability (capital goods). Production possibilities analysis can be used to illustrate the tradeoff between consumption and capital as a movement along a production possibilities curve.

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