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September 18, 2018 

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AD: The abbreviation for aggregate demand, which is the total (or aggregate) real expenditures on final goods and services produced in the domestic economy that buyers would willing and able to make at different price levels, during a given time period (usually a year). Aggregate demand (AD) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate supply. Aggregate demand, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate expenditures on domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate expenditures are consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports made by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign).

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PERFECT COMPETITION, REVENUE DIVISION: The marginal approach to analyzing a perfectly competitive firm's short-run profit maximizing production decision can be used to identify the division of total revenue among variable cost, fixed cost, and economic profit. The U-shaped cost curves used in this analysis provide all of the information needed on the cost side of the firm's decision. The demand curve facing the firm (which is also the firm's average revenue and marginal revenue curves) provides all of the information needed on the revenue side.

     See also | perfect competition, profit maximization | perfect competition, loss minimization | perfect competition, short-run supply curve | short-run production alternatives | breakeven output |


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TWO-SECTOR KEYNESIAN MODEL

A Keynesian model of the macroeconomy that includes the two private sectors, the household sector and the business sector. This Keynesian model variation, often termed the basic Keynesian model or the private sector Keynesian model, captures the interaction between induced consumption expenditures and autonomous investment expenditures. This model is commonly used to illustrate the basic workings of Keynesian economics, including equilibrium, disequilibrium, and the multiplier. Equilibrium is identified as the intersection between the C + I line and the 45-degree line. Two related variations are the three-sector Keynesian model and the four-sector Keynesian model.

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