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September 23, 2018 

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AD: The abbreviation for aggregate demand, which is the total (or aggregate) real expenditures on final goods and services produced in the domestic economy that buyers would willing and able to make at different price levels, during a given time period (usually a year). Aggregate demand (AD) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate supply. Aggregate demand, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate expenditures on domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate expenditures are consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports made by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign).

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PRICE FLOOR: A legally established minimum price. Pressured by special interest groups, our beloved government is often convinced that the price of a good needs to be kept at a higher level. Examples of goods that have had price floors bestowed upon them include farm products and workers. The argument in both of these examples is that suppliers aren't getting enough income for the stuff they sell (food or labor). A higher price is then expected to generate more income to these deserving souls. Unfortunately, price floors tend to create as many or more problems than they solve. They create inefficient surpluses.

     See also | market | price | regulation | surplus | minimum wage | price ceiling | minimum wage |


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PRICE FLOOR, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 23, 2018].


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RISK AVERSION

A preference for risk in which a person prefers guaranteed or certain income over risky income. Risk aversion arises due to decreasing marginal utility of income. A risk averse person prefers to avoid risk and is willing to pay to do so, often through the purchase of insurance. This is one of three risk preferences. The other two are risk neutrality and risk loving.

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