Google
Thursday 
January 20, 2022 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
FACTOR MARKETS: Markets used to exchange the services of a factor of production: labor, capital, land , and entrepreneurship. Factor markets, also termed resource markets, exchange the services of factors, NOT the factors themselves. For example, the labor services of workers are exchanged through factor markets NOT the actual workers. Buying and selling the actual workers is not only slavery (which is illegal) it's also the type of exchange that would take place through product markets, not factor markets. More realistically, capital and land are two resources than can be and are legally exchanged through product markets. The services of these resources, however, are exchanged through factor markets. The value of the services exchanged through factor markets each year is measured as national income.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

PRICE CEILING: A legally established maximum price. The government is occasionally inclined to keep the price of one good or another from rising too high. Examples include apartments, gasoline, and natural gas. While the goal is invariably a noble one--like keeping stuff affordable for poor people--a price ceiling often does more harm than good. First, it usually creates a shortage, meaning that many of the buyers who being protected against high prices, can't even buy the good. Second, as a consequence of this shortage, a price ceiling is likely to generate a black market where the good is sold illegally above the price ceiling.

     See also | market | price | regulation | shortage | black market | price floor |


Recommended Citation:

PRICE CEILING, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: January 20, 2022].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: price ceiling

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

UNEMPLOYMENT SOURCES

The four key types or sources of the unemployment of resources, especially labor, are cyclical, seasonal, frictional, and structural. The first, cyclical, in most important in the macroeconomic analysis of business cycles. The last two, frictional and structural, are combined into what is termed natural unemployment. Stabilization policies are generally aimed at reducing cyclical unemployment.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing about a thrift store seeking to buy either a desktop calendar with all federal and state holidays highlighted or a half-dozen helium filled balloons. Be on the lookout for pencil sharpeners with an attitude.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The word "fiscal" is derived from a Latin word meaning "moneybag."
"Act well at the moment, and you have performed a good action for all eternity."

-- Johann Kaspar Lavater

QJE
Quarterly Journal of Economics
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2022 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster