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November 1, 2014 

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LONG-RUN MARGINAL COST CURVE: A graphical representation of the relationship between long-run marginal cost and the quantity of output produced. Like other marginal curves, the long-run marginal cost curve follows the average-marginal rule relative to the long-run average cost curve. In all outward appearance, the long-run marginal cost curve looks very much like the short-run marginal cost, that is, it is U-shaped. However, the U-shape is attributable to returns to scale rather than increasing and decreasing marginal returns.

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PRICE CEILING: A legally established maximum price. The government is occasionally inclined to keep the price of one good or another from rising too high. Examples include apartments, gasoline, and natural gas. While the goal is invariably a noble one--like keeping stuff affordable for poor people--a price ceiling often does more harm than good. First, it usually creates a shortage, meaning that many of the buyers who being protected against high prices, can't even buy the good. Second, as a consequence of this shortage, a price ceiling is likely to generate a black market where the good is sold illegally above the price ceiling.

     See also | market | price | regulation | shortage | black market | price floor |


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PRICE CEILING, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: November 1, 2014].


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COLLUSION PRODUCTION ANALYSIS

To avoid competition, oligopolistic firms are occasionally inclined to cooperate through collusion. Collusion occurs when two or more oligopolistic firms jointly agree to control market prices and quantity and to generally act like a monopoly. Colluding firms set a price and produce a quantity that maximizes industry-wide economic profit, the same price and quantity that would be selected by a profit-maximizing monopoly. Once the industry-wide price and production are determined, each individual firm produces the quantity of output that equates the marginal cost of the firm to the marginal revenue for the industry.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

U 6 Unemployment
July 2014
12.2% Up a little from June
Includes those who have given up looking. BLS

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ORANGE REBELOON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store hoping to buy either a coffee table shaped like the state of Florida or storage boxes for your summer clothes. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
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This isn't me! What am I?

Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen were the 1st Nobel Prize winners in Economics in 1969.
"In the long run men hit only what they aim at. "

-- Henry David Thoreau, philosopher

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