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December 18, 2014 

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MARGINAL REVENUE, PERFECT COMPETITION: The change in total revenue resulting from a change in the quantity of output sold. Marginal revenue indicates how much extra revenue a perfectly competitive firm receives for selling an extra unit of output. It is found by dividing the change in total revenue by the change in the quantity of output. Marginal revenue is the slope of the total revenue curve and is one of two revenue concepts derived from total revenue. The other is average revenue. To maximize profit, a perfectly competitive firm equates marginal revenue and marginal cost.

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PRICE CEILING: A legally established maximum price. The government is occasionally inclined to keep the price of one good or another from rising too high. Examples include apartments, gasoline, and natural gas. While the goal is invariably a noble one--like keeping stuff affordable for poor people--a price ceiling often does more harm than good. First, it usually creates a shortage, meaning that many of the buyers who being protected against high prices, can't even buy the good. Second, as a consequence of this shortage, a price ceiling is likely to generate a black market where the good is sold illegally above the price ceiling.

     See also | market | price | regulation | shortage | black market | price floor |


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PRICE CEILING, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: December 18, 2014].


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AGGREGATE DEMAND DECREASE, LONG-RUN AGGREGATE MARKET

A shock to the long-run aggregate market caused by a decrease in aggregate demand resulting in and illustrated by a leftward shift of the aggregate demand curve. A decrease in aggregate demand in the long-run aggregate market results in an increase in the price level but no change in real production. The level of real production resulting from the aggregate demand shock is full-employment real production.

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State of the ECONOMY

Personal Income
September 2014
$14,892.6 billion
Up 0.2% from August 2014

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