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AGGREGATE DEMAND DETERMINANT: A ceteris paribus factor that affects aggregate demand, but which is assumed constant when the aggregate demand curve is constructed. Changes in any of the aggregate demand determinants cause the aggregate demand curve to shift. While a wide variety of specific ceteris paribus factors can cause the aggregate demand curve to shift, it's usually most convenient to group them into the four, broad expenditure categories -- consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports. The reason is that changes in these expenditures are the direct cause of shifts in the aggregate demand curve. If any determinant affects aggregate demand it MUST affect one of these four expenditures.

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PUBLIC CHOICE: A branch of economics that applies economic analysis to public (that is, government) decision-making, including voting behavior, legislative law-making, and related issues. Some of the more noted public choice principles include the voting paradox, logrolling, and the principle of the median voter.

     See also | political business cycle | fifth rule of imperfection | government | economic analysis |


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KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS

A theory of macroeconomics developed by John Maynard Keynes based on the proposition that aggregate demand is the primary source of business-cycle instability and the most important cause of recessions. Keynesian economics points to discretionary government policies, especially fiscal policy, as the primary means of stabilizing business cycles and tends to be favored by those on the liberal end of the political spectrum. The basic principles of Keynesian economics were developed by Keynes in his book, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, published in 1936. This work launched the modern study of macroeconomics and served as a guide for both macroeconomic theory and macroeconomic policies for four decades. Although it fell out of favor in the 1980s, Keynesian principles remain important to modern macroeconomic theories, especially aggregate market (AS-AD) analysis.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Consumer Price Index W
November 2016
235.215
Down slightly from Oct. 2016 Source: B L S

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GREEN LOGIGUIN
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store seeking to buy either a half-dozen helium filled balloons or a packet of address labels large enough for addresses of both the sender and the recipient. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from former employers.
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Approximately three-fourths of the U.S. paper currency in circular contains traces of cocaine.
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