March 17, 2018 

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WILLINGNESS TO PAY: The price or dollar amount that someone is willing to give up or pay to acquire a good or service. Willingness to pay is the source of the demand price of a good. However, unlike demand price, in which buyers are on the spot of actually giving up the payment, willingness to pay does not require an actual payment. This concept is important to benefit-cost analysis, welfare economics, and efficiency criteria, especially Kaldor-Hicks efficiency. A related concept is willingness to accept.

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BBB: The abbreviation for the Better Business Bureau, a group of businesses and organizations in a local community that seek to eliminate unethical business practices and protect consumers. The first Better Business Bureau was established in 1912 in Minnesota. Today, most local communities (read this as cities) throughout North America have Better Business Bureaus. This private response to questionable business practices should be compare with the government response, the Federal Trade Commission.

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A macroeconomic model relating the price level and real production under the assumption that ALL prices are flexible. This is one of two aggregate market submodels used to analyze business cycles, gross production, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and related macroeconomic phenomena. The other is the short-run aggregate market. The long-run aggregate market isolates the interaction between aggregate demand and long-run aggregate supply. The key assumption of this model is that ALL prices, especially resource prices, are flexible. The primary result of this model is that the economy achieves long-run equilibrium at full-employment real production.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time driving to a factory outlet seeking to buy either a graduation present for your niece or nephew or a toaster oven that has convection cooking. Be on the lookout for infected paper cuts.
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Okun's Law posits that the unemployment rate increases by 1% for every 2% gap between real GDP and full-employment real GDP.
"If football taught me anything about business, it is that you win the game one play at a time."

-- Fran Tarkenton, Football Player

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