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October 15, 2019 

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LEADING ECONOMIC INDICATOR: One of eleven economic statistics that tend to move up or down a few months before the expansions and contractions of the business cycle. These leading indicators are -- manufacturers new orders, an index of vendor performance, orders for plant and equipment, Standard & Poor's 500 index of stock prices, new building permits, durable goods manufacturers unfilled orders, the money supply, change in materials prices, average workweek in manufacturing, changes in business and consumer credit, a consumer confidence index, and initial claims for unemployment insurance. Leading indicators indicate what the aggregate economy is likely to do, business-cycle-wise, 3 to 12 months down the road. When leading indicators rise today, then the rest of the economy is likely to rise in the coming year. And when leading indicators decline, then the economy is likely to decline in 3 to 12 months.

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TFC: The abbreviation for total fixed cost, which is cost of production that does NOT change with changes in the quantity of output produced by a firm in the short run. Total fixed cost is one part of total cost. The other is total variable cost. At any and all levels of output, fixed cost is the same. It doesn't change. This includes cost that is not dependent on, or unrelated to, production. The best way to identify fixed cost is to produce zero output. Fixed cost is incurred whether or not any output is produced. A cost measure directly related to total fixed cost is average fixed cost.

     See also | total cost | fixed cost | fixed input | total variable cost | average fixed cost | quantity |


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TFC, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: October 15, 2019].


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DEADWEIGHT LOSS

The decrease in the sum of consumer surplus and producer surplus that results from the imposition of a tax. When a tax drives a wedge between demand price and supply price it disrupts what otherwise would be an efficient market equilibrium. Inefficiency arises because while a portion of the sum of consumer and producer surplus is merely transferred to government, a portion of this sum also disappears. The part that disappears is the deadweight loss and is an indicator of the inefficiency of the tax.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall trying to buy either a T-shirt commemorating the 2000 Presidential election or a really, really exciting, action-filled video game. Be on the lookout for crowded shopping malls.
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A half gallon milk jug holds about $50 in pennies.
"Give the American people a good cause, and there's nothing they can't lick. "

-- John Wayne, actor

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