March 23, 2018 

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AD: The abbreviation for aggregate demand, which is the total (or aggregate) real expenditures on final goods and services produced in the domestic economy that buyers would willing and able to make at different price levels, during a given time period (usually a year). Aggregate demand (AD) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate supply. Aggregate demand, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate expenditures on domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate expenditures are consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports made by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign).

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TOTAL VARIABLE COST: Cost of production that changes with changes in the quantity of output produced by a firm in the short run. Total variable cost is one part of total cost. The other is total fixed cost. Variable cost depends on the level of output. If a firm produces more output, then variable cost is greater. If a firm produces no output, then variable cost is zero. A cost measure directly related to total variable cost is average variable cost.

     See also | total cost | variable input | quantity | total fixed cost | average variable cost |

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Ceteris paribus influences, other than factor price, that shift the factor supply fall into three general categories: (1) market supply determinants, (2) market demand determinants, and (3) mobility. Comparable to any determinant, those falling into these three categories cause the factor supply curve to shift to a new location. An increase in factor supply is a rightward shift of the factor supply curve and a decrease in factor supply is a leftward shift.

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The portion of aggregate output U.S. citizens pay in taxes (30%) is less than the other six leading industrialized nations -- Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, or Japan.
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