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April 23, 2018 

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EQUITY MARKET: A market that trades the equity of companies. In other words, a stock market.

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ABSOLUTE POVERTY LEVEL: The amount of income a person or family needs to purchase an absolute amount of the basic necessities of life. These basic necessities are identified in terms of calories of food, BTUs of energy, square feet of living space, etc. The problem with the absolute poverty level is that there really are no absolutes when in comes to consuming goods. You can consume a given poverty level of calories eating relatively expensive steak, relatively inexpensive pasta, or garbage from a restaurant dumpster. The income needed to acquire each of these calorie "minimums" vary greatly. That's why some prefer a relative poverty level.

     See also | income | poverty | poverty line | relative poverty level | welfare | transfer payment | standard of living |


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ABSOLUTE POVERTY LEVEL, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: April 23, 2018].


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PAPER ECONOMY

Markets, exchanges, and other assorted economic activities that deal with legal or paper claims on physical assets rather than the physical assets. The vast majority of activities for the paper economy take place through financial markets. The paper economy complements production and consumption activities of the real economy that involve product markets and resource markets.

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APLS

BLUE PLACIDOLA
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through mail order catalogs trying to buy either a graduation present for your niece or nephew or a toaster oven that has convection cooking. Be on the lookout for rusty deck screws.
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In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
"The past cannot be changed. The future is yet in your power. "

-- Hugh White, U.S. Senator

FTC
Federal Trade Commission
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