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REALISM OF MONOPOLY: If taken to the extreme, monopoly, like perfect competition is an ideal market structure that does not actually exist in the real world. In the extreme, a "pure" monopoly is a market containing one and only ONE seller of good, a good with absolutely, positively no substitutes. The product is absolutely, certifiably unique. It's not just that it has no CLOSE substitutes, it has NO substitutes. Period. End of story. In the real world, however, every product, no matter how seemingly unique it might appear, has substitutes. The substitutes might not be very close. They might be really, really bad substitutes. But they are substitutes. As such, there are no pure monopolies in the real world.

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AVERAGE PRODUCT: The quantity of total output produced per unit of a variable input, holding all other inputs fixed. It is found by dividing total product by the quantity of the variable input. Average product, abbreviated AP also goes by the alias of average physical product (APP), so don't be confused by the extra term (physical). Compare this term with marginal product and average revenue product when you have a chance. If you haven't yet come across the term, then you really should spend some time with the law of diminishing marginal returns. The average-marginal rule is also worth a look.

     See also | total product | variable input | fixed input | average physical product | average revenue product | total revenue | marginal productivity theory | factor markets | marginal physical product | marginal physical product | marginal revenue product | law of diminishing marginal returns |


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AVERAGE PRODUCT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: April 21, 2024].


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PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION

Slight differences that exist between two or more goods that are essentially the same and which satisfy the same basic want or need. This is generally pursued in monopolistic competition and oligopoly by firms seeking to increase sales and profit. Many of the best known businesses in the economy practice product differentiation to gain an advantage on the competition and to acquire a bit of market control. For example, Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola are very similar, but each has a few differences in terms of taste, packaging, and esteem.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing about a thrift store seeking to buy either a packet of address labels large enough for addresses of both the sender and the recipient or a key chain with a built-in flashlight and panic button. Be on the lookout for door-to-door salesmen.
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Okun's Law posits that the unemployment rate increases by 1% for every 2% gap between real GDP and full-employment real GDP.
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