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December 10, 2022 

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INCOME, DEMAND DETERMINANT: One of the five demand determinants assumed constant when a demand curve is constructed, and that shift the demand curve when they change. Income affects demand differently for normal goods and inferior goods. A normal good, the name indicates, is affected by income much as you might expect. Additional income allows buyers to purchase more normal goods, thus demand increases with an increase in income. The demand for an inferior good is affected exactly opposite. An increase in income causes a decrease in the demand for an inferior good. Buyers decide to buy less of an inferior good when they have additional income.

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LAW OF DIMINISHING MARGINAL RETURNS: A principle stating that as more and more of a variable input is combined with a fixed input in short-run production, the marginal product of the variable input eventually declines. This is THE economic principle underlying the analysis of short-run production for a firm. Among a host of other things, it offers an explanation for the upward-sloping market supply curve. How does the law of diminishing marginal returns help us understand supply? The law of supply and the upward-sloping supply curve indicate that a firm needs to receive higher prices to produce and sell larger quantities. Why do they need higher prices?

     See also | increasing marginal returns | decreasing marginal returns | marginal product | marginal cost | short-run production | supply curve | fixed input | variable input |


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LAW OF DIMINISHING MARGINAL RETURNS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: December 10, 2022].


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ENDPOINT ELASTICITY FORMULA

A simple technique for calculating the coefficient of elasticity by estimating the elasticity for discrete changes in two variables using the initial values of each. The distinguishing characteristic of this formula is that percentage changes are calculated based on the initial values of each variable. An alternative technique is the midpoint elasticity formula.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store seeking to buy either a wall poster commemorating last Friday (you know why) or a country wreathe. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
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The portion of aggregate output U.S. citizens pay in taxes (30%) is less than the other six leading industrialized nations -- Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, or Japan.
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