Google
Friday 
December 1, 2023 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
FACTOR SUPPLY CURVE: A graphical representation of the relation between the price to a factor of production and quantity of the factor supplied, holding all ceteris paribus factor supply determinants constant. The factor supply curve is one half of the factor market. The other half is the factor demand curve. The factor supply curve indicates the quantity of a factor that would be supplied at alternative factor prices. While all factors of production, or scarce resources, including labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship, have factor supply curves, labor is the factor most often analyzed. Like other supply curves, the factor supply curve is generally positively sloped. Higher factor prices are associated with larger quantities supplied and lower factor prices go with smaller quantities supplied.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

MARGINAL PRODUCT: The change in the quantity of total product resulting from a unit change in a variable input, keeping all other inputs unchanged. Marginal product, usually abbreviated MP, is found by dividing the change in total product by the change in the variable input. Marginal product lies at the very foundation of the analysis of short-run production and the subsequent explanation of the law of supply and the upward-sloping supply curve, using the law of diminishing marginal returns.

     See also | total product | output | input | variable input | fixed input | average product | marginal cost | law of diminishing marginal returns | average-marginal rule | total-marginal rule | short-run production | marginal physical product |


Recommended Citation:

MARGINAL PRODUCT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2023. [Accessed: December 1, 2023].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: marginal product

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

TAX EFFECTS

The primary reason that governments collect taxes from members of society is to finance government operations and provide public goods. However, taxes also create disincentives to engage in the taxed activity, which causes a change in the allocation of resources. This two consequences of taxes are summarized in two essential tax effects -- the revenue effect and the allocation effect. While all taxes have both, the key to effective government is minimize the allocation effect if the goal is to generate revenue and to minimize the revenue effect if the goal is to change the allocation of resources.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

ORANGE REBELOON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers wanting to buy either a turbo-powered vacuum cleaner or a battery-powered, rechargeable vacuum cleaner. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The penny is the only coin minted by the U.S. government in which the "face" on the head looks to the right. All others face left.
"Sometimes our light goes out, but is blown into flame by another human being. Each of us owes deepest thanks to those who have rekindled this light. "

-- Albert Schweitzer, missionary physician

ACV
Actual Cash Value
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2023 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster