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FACTOR MARKETS: Markets used to exchange the services of a factor of production: labor, capital, land , and entrepreneurship. Factor markets, also termed resource markets, exchange the services of factors, NOT the factors themselves. For example, the labor services of workers are exchanged through factor markets NOT the actual workers. Buying and selling the actual workers is not only slavery (which is illegal) it's also the type of exchange that would take place through product markets, not factor markets. More realistically, capital and land are two resources than can be and are legally exchanged through product markets. The services of these resources, however, are exchanged through factor markets. The value of the services exchanged through factor markets each year is measured as national income.

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DECREASING MARGINAL RETURNS: In the short-run production of a firm, an increase in the variable input results in a decrease in the marginal product of the variable input. Decreasing marginal returns typically surface after the first few quantities of a variable input are added to a fixed input. Compare this with increasing marginal returns. You should also compare this with diseconomies of scale associated with long-run production.

     See also | short-run production | law of diminishing marginal returns | fixed input | variable input | marginal product | average product | total product | short-run production | long-run production |


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IMPLICIT LOGROLLING

The trading of votes to ensure a favorable outcome for two or more separate decisions undertaken by combined both decisions into a single vote. Commonly practiced in legislative bodies, implicit logrolling occurs when two separate programs or policies are combined into a single package, which is then subject to a single vote. The contrast is with explicit logrolling in which each of two voters agree to cast separate votes for two separate programs. Whether implicit or explicit, logrolling is generally used when neither decision is able to obtain the necessary majority of the votes needed for passage on their own accord.

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