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VOTING PARADOX: The observation that voting by a relatively small group of people might generate a intransitive or inconsistent ranking of three or more alternatives, creating a paradox of rankings. The preferences of rational individuals are generally assumed to transitive and consistent, that is, if a person prefers A to B and B to C, then the person also prefers A to C. However, the preferences of group of voters might not be consistent. That is, as a group, voters might prefer A to B and B to C, but then prefer C to A. This is not only paradoxical and confusing, it also can be inefficient.

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FACTOR PAYMENTS: Wage, interest, rent, and profit payments for the services of scarce resources, or the factors of production (labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship), in return for productive services. Factor payments are frequently categorized according to the services of the productive resource. Wages are paid for the services of labor, interest is the payment for the services of capital, rent is the services for land, and profit is the factor payment to entrepreneurship. In the circular flow, these are payments made by the business sector for factor services purchased from the household sector through the financial markets.

     See also | wage | interest | rent | profit | labor | capital | land | entrepreneurship | factor price | factor demand | factor supply | factor markets | factors of production | circular flow | business sector | household sector | national income |


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TOTAL PRODUCT CURVE

A curve that graphically represents the relation between total production by a firm in the short run and the quantity of a variable input added to a fixed input. When constructing this curve, it is assumed that total product changes from changes in the quantity of a variable input (like labor), while other inputs (like capital) are fixed. This is one of three key product curves used in the analysis of short-run production. The other two are marginal product curve and average product curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching infomercials hoping to buy either a flower arrangement with daisies and carnations for your uncle or a coffee cup commemorating next Thursday. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from former employers.
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In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
"There is no point at which you can say, „Well, I'm successful now. I might as well take a nap.¾"

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