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DISINTERMEDIATION: A general deterioration in the profitability of a bank because it pays high interest rates on short-term borrowing, but earns relatively low interest rates on long-term lending. This was a big, BIG problem for savings and loans (S&Ls) during the 1970s and ultimately caused many of them to fail in the 1980s. S&Ls were designed (by law) to make long-term (30-year) home loans to consumers, but to get the funds for these loans using standard savings accounts. When inflation and interest rates shot up in the 1970s, S&Ls found it necessary to pay savers higher rates to get the funds. But, they still had a bunch of home loans--with low interest rates--that were 15, 20, or 25 years from being repaid. For several years, S&Ls received 6 percent on many of their loans, but paid out something like 12 percent. This gradually eroded their profitability until many were forced to close their doors.

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PROFIT: As a generic term, this is the difference between revenue and cost. There are, however, three specific sorts of profit, each with a different meaning. Accounting profit is the difference between revenue and accounting expenses. Economic profit is the difference between revenue and the opportunity cost of production. Normal profit is the economic profit that could be earned by an entrepreneur in another business and is thus an opportunity cost deducted from revenue when calculating economic profit.

     See also | total revenue | total cost | accounting profit | economic profit | normal profit | opportunity cost | profit maximization | profit curve | entrepreneurship | corporate profits |


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PROFIT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: August 23, 2019].


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FALLACIES

Logical errors in an argument or evaluation of a policy. The six common fallacies that surface in economic analysis are: false cause, personal attack, division, composition, false authority, and mass appeal. These fallacies are most troublesome because, although false, they seem correct, especially when used by slick-talking, charismatic people (politicians) or when the fallacies support preconceived notions or fundamental beliefs.

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The first "Black Friday" on record, a friday marked by a major financial catastrophe, occurred on September 24, 1869 -- A FRIDAY -- when an attempted cornering of the gold market induced a financial crises and economy-wide depression.
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