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LAFFER CURVE: The graphical inverted-U relation between tax rates and total tax collections by government. Developed by economist Arthur Laffer, the Laffer curve formed a key theoretical foundation for supply-side economics of President Reagan during the 1980s. It is based on the notion that government collects zero revenue if the tax rate is 0% and if the tax rate is 100%. At a 100% tax rate no one has the incentive to work, produce, and earn income, so there is no income to tax. As such, the optimum tax rate, in which government revenue is maximized, lies somewhere between 0% and 100%. This generates a curve shaped like and inverted U, rising from zero to a peak, then falling back to zero. If the economy is operating to the right of the peak, then government revenue can be increased by decreasing the tax rate. This was used to justify supply-side economic policies during the Reagan Administration, especially the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 (Kemp-Roth Act).

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FACTORY: The building and equipment (the physical capital) at a particular location used for the production of goods and services. A factory often takes the form of the conventional assembly-line system, but it need not. As the building and equipment used for production, a factory can also be restaurant, doctor's office, or university classroom. Moreover, while a factory is often associated with the notion of firm or business, they need not be one and the same. A firm can, often does, own more than one factory and a factory can be owned by more than one firm.

     See also | capital | physical capital | plant | firm | business | plant |


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FACTORY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2021. [Accessed: November 26, 2021].


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ALLOCATION EFFECT

A change in the allocation of resources caused by placing taxes on economic activity. By creating disincentives to produce, consume, or exchange, taxes generally alter resource allocations. The allocation effect is typically used when governments seek to discourage the production, consumption, or exchange of particular goods or activities that are deemed undesirable (such as tobacco use or pollution). This is one of two effects of taxation. The other (primary) is the revenue effect, which is the generation of revenue used to finance government operations.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction looking to buy either a graduation present for your niece or nephew or a toaster oven that has convection cooking. Be on the lookout for strangers with large satchels of used undergarments.
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In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
"There is more to life than increasing its speed. "

-- Mohandas Gandhi, activist

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