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GOVERNMENT PURCHASES LINE: A graphical depiction of the relation between government purchases and national income (or gross domestic product) that plays a role in Keynesian economics and the Keynesian cross. The slope of this line is positive, greater than zero, less than one, and goes by the name marginal propensity for government purchases. The vertical intercept of this line is autonomous government purchases. The aggregate expenditures line used in the Keynesian cross is obtained by adding this government purchases line, as well as, investment expenditures and net exports, to the consumption line. The government purchases line is also combined with investment expenditures for the Keynesian saving-investment model.

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IN-KIND PAYMENT: A payment, usually in exchange for the productive efforts of resources, that takes the form of goods and services rather than the economy's standard monetary unit (that is, dollars). In other words, resource owners are compensated with a portion of the output that they helped to produce. The standard method of compensation, which is illustrated by the circular flow model, is for a firm to pay resource owners using money revenue received from selling its production. Hence most factor payments are monetary payments. However, in some circumstances firms and resource owners find it more convenient to use actual production for compensation, eliminating the middle sell-production-for-money step

     See also | gross domestic product | National Income and Product Accounts | monetary unit | factor payment | income |


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FULL-RESERVE BANKING

A (hypothetical) method of banking in which banks keep 100 percent of their deposits in the form of bank reserves, meaning there are no deposits available for interest-paying loans. Full-reserve banking is one of two theoretical alternatives designed to help illustrate a contrast to the fractional-reserve banking actually practiced by modern banks. The other alternative is no-reserve banking. With full-reserve a bank essentially operates as a storage business, merely storing customer deposits until they are withdrawn.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center seeking to buy either a microwave over that won't burn your popcorn or a T-shirt commemorating the first day of winter. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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On a typical day, the United States Mint produces over $1 million worth of dimes.
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