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SPECIALIZATION: The condition in which resources are primarily devoted to specific tasks. This is one of THE most important and most fundamental notions in the study of economics. Civilized human beings have long recognized that limited resources can be more effectively used in the production the goods and services that satisfy unlimited wants and needs if those resources specialize. For example, three ice cream parlor workers, can be, in total, more productive if one runs the cash register, another scoops the ice cream, and a third adds the hot fudge topping. By devoting their energies to learning how to do their respective tasks really, really well, these three workers can produce more hot fudge sundaes than if each performed all required tasks.

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INCENTIVE: A cost or benefit that motivates a decision or action by consumers, businesses, or other participants in the economy. Some incentives are explicitly created by government policies to achieve a desired end or they can just be part of the wacky world we call economics. The most noted incentive in the study of economics is that provided by prices. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the . When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation system that society uses to answer the three questions of allocation.

     See also | cost | consumer | business | economic policies | price | allocation | three questions of allocation | efficiency | invisible hand |


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INCENTIVE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 22, 2018].


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SAY'S LAW

A principle of classical economics developed the French economist Jean-Baptiste Say that is commonly summarized as "supply creates its own demand." This law, also referred to as Say's "theory of markets" or "law of markets," indicates that the act of producing aggregate output generates a sufficient amount of aggregate income to purchase all of the output produced. This principle indicated that excess production or insufficient demand for production was unlikely to occur, at least for any extended period. When combined with flexible prices and saving-investment equality, Say's law further implied that an economy would achieve and maintain full employment of resources. This law was singled out by John Maynard Keynes in his critique of classical economics, but remains relevant in current macroeconomic analysis, reflected in the circular flow model.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction hoping to buy either a hepa filter for your furnace or a wall poster commemorating next Thursday. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
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Parker Brothers, the folks who produce the Monopoly board game, prints more Monopoly money each year than real currency printed by the U.S. government.
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