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September 22, 2018 

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LEADING ECONOMIC INDICATOR: One of eleven economic statistics that tend to move up or down a few months before the expansions and contractions of the business cycle. These leading indicators are -- manufacturers new orders, an index of vendor performance, orders for plant and equipment, Standard & Poor's 500 index of stock prices, new building permits, durable goods manufacturers unfilled orders, the money supply, change in materials prices, average workweek in manufacturing, changes in business and consumer credit, a consumer confidence index, and initial claims for unemployment insurance. Leading indicators indicate what the aggregate economy is likely to do, business-cycle-wise, 3 to 12 months down the road. When leading indicators rise today, then the rest of the economy is likely to rise in the coming year. And when leading indicators decline, then the economy is likely to decline in 3 to 12 months.

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MATURITY: That date at which the principal on a bond or similar financial asset needs to be repaid. Maturity dates can be anywhere from a few hours to 30 or more years. For example, government securities are classified by their maturity dates, with Treasury bills maturing in one year or less, Treasury notes in 1 to 10 years, and Treasury bonds in 10 years or more. Under normal (nonrecessionary) conditions, shorter maturity periods carry lower interest rates, while longer maturities need higher interest rates to compensate for the uncertainty of tying funds up for longer periods.

     See also | bond | government securities | Treasury bill | Treasury note | Treasury bond | money market | capital market | financial markets |


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MATURITY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 22, 2018].


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AGGREGATE DEMAND DECREASE, SHORT-RUN AGGREGATE MARKET

A shock to the short-run aggregate market caused by a decrease in aggregate demand, resulting in and illustrated by a leftward shift of the aggregate demand curve. A decrease in aggregate demand in the short-run aggregate market results in a decrease in the price level and a decrease in real production. The level of real production resulting from the shock can be greater or less than full-employment real production.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through mail order catalogs trying to buy either a remote controlled World War I bi-plane or a wall poster commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki. Be on the lookout for slightly overweight pizza delivery guys.
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