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October 18, 2018 

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MARGINAL REVENUE PRODUCT AND FACTOR DEMAND: A perfectly competitive firm's factor demand curve is that negatively-sloped portion of its marginal revenue product curve. A perfectly competitive firm maximizes profit by hiring the quantity of input that equates factor price and marginal revenue product. As such, the firm moves along its negatively-sloped marginal revenue product curve in response to changing factor prices.

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NEAR MONEY: Assets that are highly liquid, and can be easily exchanged for money, but can not be used directly to purchase goods. The best examples are savings accounts, certificates of deposit, and similar bank accounts. These savings near monies are added to M1 to derived M2. Several investment type near monies are added to M2 to derived M3.

     See also | money | saving | M1 | M2 | M3 | monetary aggregate |


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST

Total factor cost per unit of factor input employed by a firm in the production of output, found by dividing total factor cost by the quantity of factor input. Average factor cost, abbreviated AFC, is generally equal to the factor price. However, using the longer term average factor cost makes it easier to see the connection to related terms, including total factor cost and marginal factor cost.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction looking to buy either a handcrafted spice rack or a cell phone case. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
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The 22.6% decline in stock prices on October 19, 1987 was larger than the infamous 12.8% decline on October 29, 1929.
"Executives who get there and stay suggest solutions when they present the problems. "

-- Malcolm Forbes, business executive

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