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February 17, 2020 

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COMPLEMENT-IN-PRODUCTION: One of two goods that are produced jointly using the same resource -- that is, the production of one good automatically triggers the production of the other. The terms "joint products" or "by-products" are two terms commonly used for complements-in-production. A complement-in-production is one of two alternatives falling within the other prices determinant of supply. The other is a substitute-in-production. An increase in the price of one complement-in-production causes a increase in supply of the other. Complements-in-production are goods produced jointly from the same resource or input. This typically happens when the resource in question has parts that can be separated into different products. One example is the production of two goods -- beef and leather -- from one resource -- cattle. Another complement in production example is lumber and sawdust, both produced from a single tree.

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TRANSACTIONS DEPOSITS: A fancy, schmancy, official term for checkable deposits. This is the term typically used by the Federal Reserve System when they speak of checking accounts. The logic is that this are the accounts that are used to conduct transactions, that is, are used as money.

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EFFECTIVE DEMAND

A key conceptual notion of Keynesian economics stipulating that the aggregate expenditures on real production is based on existing or actual income rather than the income that would be generated with full employment of resources. Effective demand is embodied in the aggregate expenditures line, which has a positive slope, but a slope of less than one. This concept was proposed by Thomas Robert Malthus in the early 1800s as a counter argument to Say's law found in classical economics and then found new life when John Maynard Keynes developed his theory in the 1930s.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a crowded estate auction looking to buy either a coffee cup commemorating next Thursday or a replacement remote control for your stereo system. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
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On a typical day, the United States Mint produces over $1 million worth of dimes.
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