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October 19, 2019 

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COMPETITION: In general, the actions of two or more rivals in pursuit of the same objective. In the context of markets, the specific objective is either selling goods to buyers or alternatively buying goods from sellers. Competition tends to come in two varieties -- competition among the few, which is market with a small number of sellers (or buyers), such that each seller (or buyer) has some degree of market control, and competition among the many, which is a market with so many buyers and sellers that none is able to influence the market price or quantity exchanged.

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FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM: THE central bank of the United States. It includes a Board of Governors, 12 District Banks, 25 Branch Banks, and assorted committees. The most important of these committees is the Federal Open Market Committee, which directs monetary policy. The Fed (as many like to call it) was established in 1913 and modified significantly during the Great Depression of the 1930s. It's duties are to maintain the stability of the banking system, regulate banks, and oversee the nation's money supply.

     See also | Board of Governors | Board of Governors, Chairman | Federal Reserve Bank | Federal Reserve District Bank | Federal Reserve Branch Bank | Board of Governors | Federal Open Market Committee | Federal Advisory Council | money supply | monetary policy | bank | monetary aggregate | open market operations | discount rate | reserve requirements | Federal Reserve note | bank reserves | Federal Reserve deposits |


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INELASTIC SUPPLY

The general elasticity relation in which relatively large changes in price cause relatively small changes in quantity supplied. Large changes in price cause relatively small changes in quantity supplied or the percentage change in quantity supplied is smaller than the percentage change in price. This characterization of elasticity is most important for the price elasticity of supply. Inelastic supply is one of two general elasticity relations for supply. The other is elastic supply.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching the newspaper want ads looking to buy either a three-hole paper punch or decorative picture frames. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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The portion of aggregate output U.S. citizens pay in taxes (30%) is less than the other six leading industrialized nations -- Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, or Japan.
"Think not of yourself as the architect of your career but as the sculptor. Expect to have to do a lot of hard hammering and chiseling and scraping and polishing. "

-- B. C. Forbes, founder, Forbes magazine

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